"Layered Watercolors"

 

1) The artist first executes the watercolor (on 300 lb cold press paper) and tears away critical edges of the composition. He mounts the irregularly shaped painting on thin plywood which he shapes with a knife to further the painting’s “torn” or “broken-edged” appearance. (step not shown)

2) The watercolor is secured to a secondary plywood base and the artist paints the sculptural edges.

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3) Next, the artist begins to glue into place the painting’s underpinnings or “foundation blocks”—a variety of hand-cast plaster components that resemble tiles or rusticated masonry. (details #2, #3)
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4) With the plaster components in place, the artist paints the uneven white surface with heavy black ink.
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5) At last the artist begins the most crucial part––tinting the understructure (with acrylics) in a way that suggests a coloristic archeology running below the painting, and bridges the watercolor with its understructure.

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